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How to Be authentic on video using a video script outline

Class is in session.

When thinking about authenticity, the first question that might pop into your mind is: “How can I even be authentic?” It’s a fair question to ask. But let me tell you what, IF YOU ARE ASKING YOURSELF THAT QUESTION, THE THOUGHT OF BEING AUTHENTIC MIGHT BE HOLDING YOU BACK.

After all, authenticity is inherently built around the idea of being yourself, and overthinking this removes the fact of being authentic. Start by letting it go and talk about whatever is on your mind. Don’t let what other people are going to say affect you.

Authenticity is not about perfection or never having doubts or fears. It is about being true to yourself and being honest with others. It is about being genuine and transparent in your actions and words. It is not always easy, but it is a worthwhile pursuit.

A TED Talk by Herminia Ibarra on what it really means to be authentic.

Value is defined by your audience. It’s up to you to find out what actually matters to them. Maybe it’s financial security. Maybe it’s environmental consciousness. Again, you need to put yourself second to your audience.

A YouTube video script outline is a plan for the content of your video. It typically includes the main points you want to cover, any key messages or takeaways, and a rough idea of how the video will be structured.

To create a script outline, start by brainstorming the main points you want to cover in your video. Consider what your audience wants to know and what value your video will provide for them.

Next, organize your points into a logical structure, such as a beginning, middle, and end, or a problem and solution format.

Finally, write out your script outline in bullet points or short sentences, making sure to include any key messages or takeaways. This will serve as a blueprint for your video script and help you stay focused and organized as you create your content.

UsING a script or not when recording video for Youtube?

Video scripts are great tools that keep you focused on the most important points without rambling too much. But relying too much on a script during production can actually hurt your video’s authenticity.

Someone who checks his or her script every few seconds before rattling off a line looks more like a robot than an authentic person with a message. Actors use scripts, and if you do too, some people might wonder: is this whole thing an act?

Recording Video GIF by Aurora Consulting: Business, Insurance, Financing Experts - Find & Share on GIPHY

When creating a video, it is important to strike a balance between using a script to guide the content and being spontaneous and genuine in your delivery. A script can help you stay focused and organized, but if you rely too heavily on it, your video may come across as stiff and rehearsed. Instead, try to use the script as a guide and allow yourself to be natural and authentic in your delivery. This will help your video feel more genuine and engaging to your audience.

You can make the best use of scripts by studying them closely before the shoot. Once you’re familiar with the key points you want to make, try putting the script aside while the cameras roll.

Your presentation won’t be a perfect copy of the script line by line, and that’s okay. You’ll give your quirks and unique personality – the things that make you authentic – a chance to come out while still making your key points.

How to OPEN UP AND SHARE about yourself

Viewers don’t just want to invest in solutions to their problems. They also want to know they’re starting a relationship with the right people. Getting to know the people behind the business a little first helps.

Showing the human side of your business can help build trust and authenticity with your audience. This can be done through personal introductions, behind-the-scenes content, and interviews with your team members.

By giving viewers a glimpse into the people behind your business, you can create a more personal and relatable connection with them. This can help establish trust and encourage them to invest in your solutions.

Be Yourself Fx Networks GIF by Pose FX - Find & Share on GIPHY

Don’t be afraid to open up to the viewer. Instead of portraying a flawless (but bland) corporate persona, why not tell a story, something you’ve struggled with, or your hopes and dreams?

You can pull this off without appearing unprofessional – or turning your videos into a personal diary. A balance of polished presentation with a few dashes of human openness will build rapport quickly.

Take advantage of NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

Nonverbal cues, such as body language and facial expressions, can have a significant impact on how your message is received by your audience. It is important to be aware of these cues and ensure that they align with the message you are trying to convey.

For example, if you are speaking about a sensitive topic, it may be helpful to maintain a calm and relaxed posture to show that you are sincere and empathetic.

Research has shown that nonverbal communication, such as body language and facial expressions, plays a significant role in how we communicate and interpret messages.

In fact, some studies have found that up to 90% of all communication is nonverbal. This means that the way we move our bodies, the tone of our voice, and even the way we make eye contact can all convey meaning and influence how our message is received.

It is important to be aware of these nonverbal cues and use them effectively to communicate with others. This can help improve the clarity and effectiveness of your message, and it can also help build trust and rapport with your audience.

On the other hand, if you are discussing an exciting new product, using animated gestures and expressions can help convey your enthusiasm and excitement. Paying attention to these nonverbal cues can help improve the authenticity of your message and build trust with your audience.

A lot of our body language stems from habits that have been so deeply ingrained we don’t even know we’re doing them anymore.

Self-reflection and self-awareness are key to improving your body language and nonverbal communication. One way to do this is by recording yourself and reviewing the footage. This can help you identify any habits or patterns in your body language that may be detracting from your message.

For example, you may notice that you tend to fidget or cross your arms when you are feeling nervous. By bringing these habits to your attention, you can take steps to change them and improve your nonverbal communication. It may be difficult to watch yourself on video, but it can be a valuable tool for improving your authenticity and building trust with your audience.

IMAGINE YOU’RE TALKING TO JUST ONE PERSON

But you can’t act that way when you’re producing it. If you do, you’ll end up conveying a kind of rehearsed, phony “public speaker persona” to your audience.

It’s harder for viewers to relate on an individual level because they feel like they’re just another number in a huge group. And in the back of their minds they wonder: is this really how this person acts? Or is it just for show?

One way to improve the authenticity and relatability of your videos is to make them more personal and intimate. This can be achieved by using a conversational tone and addressing your audience as individuals rather than as a large group.

For example, instead of saying “Hello, viewers” you could say “Hello, friends” or “Hello, fellow [insert common interest].” This small change in language can make a big difference in how your audience perceives you and your message.

It can help create a more personal connection and make them feel like they are having a one-on-one conversation with you, rather than just being part of a faceless audience. This can help improve the authenticity and relatability of your videos.

The narrower your focus, the easier it is to build stronger connections with your audience.

A simple youtube script for free

Below is a free Youtube script model by Backlinko for you to replicate. Simply paste this on a Word doc or Google Doc.

Video Script Template

In this video script template, I’ll walk you through the 4 major parts of an engaging video script. Just replace the example text in each section with your own.

H=Hook

The hook is something that grabs viewers’ attention in the first 15 seconds. Even though it’s short, the hook is INCREDIBLY important. Because it’s the part of the video where people decide whether to move on or stay with you.

For example: A brief summary of what your video is about, An attention-grabbing line, A teaser for what’s coming up later.

I=Intro

The intro comes right after the hook. Its purpose is to quickly introduce the topic. You can also introduce yourself if you’d like to. 

This is also a good place to preview what you’re going to talk about, show an example, or tease a specific tip that’s coming up. Like the hook, it’s best to keep this section brief.

You can write your intro below.

C=Content

Now it’s time for the main content of your video.

Naturally, this is the longest part of your script. Remember to keep it snappy so people don’t get bored and leave.

C=Call to Action

At the very end of your video, you want to ask people to do something. If the video is for YouTube, it’s common to ask people to like the video, subscribe to your channel, and maybe leave a comment. 

On other platforms, you might ask them to do something else. Like share the video. Visit your website. Or subscribe to your email list.

A video outline is a script in a more simple way

A Video Outline A video outline is a plan for the content of your video. It can help you stay focused and organized as you create your content, and it can serve as a reference as you write your script and plan your shots.

To create a video outline, start by brainstorming the main points you want to cover in your video. Consider what your audience wants to know and what value your video will provide for them.

Next, organize your points into a logical structure, such as a beginning, middle, and end, or a problem and solution format.

Finally, write out your video outline in bullet points or short sentences, making sure to include any key messages or takeaways. This will serve as a blueprint for your video and help ensure that it is coherent and effective.

I love this video outline example below by Media Beyond. It helped me focus.

Demonstrate my app’s awesomeness.

  1. Thesis – The ability of my app to read your mind will make your life incredible.
  2. Support #1– It knows when you’re about to say something stupid and interrupts you with a custom notification, improving your communication.
  3. Support #2 – It knows if you’re wearing an unflattering outfit just because you want to look trendy, and reminds you to be yourself via SMS, improving your appearance.
  4. Support #3 – It knows when you’re sad, and updates your wallpaper with cute animal photos until you smile, improving your mood.
  5. Conclusion – You know what this part is – ‘Tell ’em what you told ’em’ – but with different words. Maybe “Better Thoughts, Better Looks, Better Feelings – yes, there is an app for that.”
  6. Call To Action – By now they’re salivating to get your app. Give them something to sink their teeth into, ideally with a link nearby. “Download from the App Store Now!” is ideal in our test case.

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